Fans told ‘tattoos are not clothes’ in the code of conduct for World Cup matches

Fans told ‘tattoos are not clothes’ in the code of conduct for World Cup matches

Qatar fans in the stadium during the opening game between Qatar and Ecuador at Al Bayt Stadium today

Qatar fans in the stadium during the opening match between Qatar and Ecuador at Al Bayt Stadium today (Photo: Getty)

All fans attending World Cup matches in Qatar have been told to adhere to a code of conduct that includes not being visibly intoxicated and keeping their clothes on.

The document published by FIFA applies to all 64 matches played at the tournament in the Gulf state.

A section advises ticket holders on their behavior in stadiums and goes through a list of things they must not do unless “explicitly authorized by the event organisers, if applicable”.

They include: “Removing any garments or otherwise remaining in a state of undress (including being shirtless) or revealing intimate body parts.

“For the avoidance of doubt, body tattoos and body paint are not clothing.”

It says, “Visibly under the influence of alcohol, narcotics, or any narcotics.”

The part of the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 guidelines telling people not to undress

The part of the guidance that tells people not to undress (Photo: Fifa)

The guidance concludes: ‘These lists of mandatory and prohibited acts are not exhaustive.

“The organizers of the event reserve the right to make a final decision as to whether conduct in the stadium is prohibited, which must be respected.”

The British Foreign Office advises visitors to Qatar to dress ‘modestly’ in public and warns that drinking alcohol or being drunk in public is an offense punishable by up to six months’ imprisonment or a fine.

With temperatures in Doha expected to reach 30°C during the day, fans may be tempted to take off their gear to cool down, but have been warned that this will be frowned upon.

Fans are expected to be directed to kiosks in the ground for food, water and other non-alcoholic beverages.

Prohibited items are listed by FIFA as “bottles, cups, jars, cans or any other form of closed or covered container that may be thrown away or cause injury.”

A Newcastle fan at a Premier League game against Manchester City in May.  This would not be allowed in Qatar

A Newcastle fan at a Premier League game against Manchester City in May. This would not be allowed at the World Cup according to the FIFA document (Photo: Getty)

The stadium guidance notes that “foods of all kinds, except those purchased at the stadium or those medically required or for infants or young infants,” are also prohibited, a move likely to help tournament sponsors provide food.

It’s also bad news for fans of “inflatable balls” and “other inflated or inflatable items, such as balloons,” as those are also banned.

Selfie sticks are a no-no, as are tripods, binoculars (unless needed for accessibility reasons) and it is forbidden to take pictures of security personnel wearing uniform.

Bags must be able to be stowed under seats and are considered ‘large’ if the ‘sum of three dimensions of length, width and height exceeds 75 centimeters’.

A later section emphasizes that all materials of a “political, offensive and/or discriminatory nature, containing wording, symbols or other attributes aimed at discrimination of any kind” are prohibited.

This could also get players into trouble, with England captain Harry Kane receiving a possible yellow card for wearing his ‘One Love’ rainbow bracelet that supports LGBTQ+ rights.

Fans at the Budweiser bar during the opening of the FIFA fan festival in Doha, Qatar, yesterday

Fans at the Budweiser bar in Doha during the opening of the FIFA fan festival yesterday (Image: Reuters)

In the run-up to the tournament, fans have been seen blowing horns in Doha, although vuvuzelas are also not allowed in the stadiums.

The plastic horns were a familiar sound during the 2010 World Cup in South Africa, although the constant honking by fans divided opinion, especially for those watching on television.

Musical instruments that “do not easily” fit through the x-ray baggage scanner for security checks are prohibited unless fans have received approval from the event organizers prior to the match.

The document adds: “The applicable event organizer may require ticketholders to stop using musical instruments if the sound emanating from the applicable device interferes with the operation of the event or the enjoyment of other ticketholders.

“Electronic, mechanical or manual devices that generate noise or other excessively loud noises, such as vuvuzelas, whistles, loudspeakers, etc. drum heaters are also prohibited.”

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